2012
Aug 22

Food, Shape, and Color

by Hannah Holt »

8 comments


The next two weeks will be crazy for me. School is starting; I’m running in a 200 mile relay race; And I’m working on two (or three or four) exciting longer term projects.

So I’m taking a break from the blog front.

In the mean time, here’s a little food for thought.

Click here for a printable pdf of the image.

Activities:

  1. Show kids the food chart. Ask them to think of other red colored foods. (Repeat with orange, yellow, green…)
  2. Use foods as a way to introduce 3-D shapes (an orange could be a sphere, carrot for cone, chocolate bar for rectangular prism…). It’s a lesson and a snack!
  3. Have children fill out the USDA food pyramid coloring page for kids.
  4. Read Spicy Alphabet, and name all the different colors.

More resources about food, shape, and color.

  1. Hubbard’s Cupboard has a free printable booklet about shapes and colors.
  2. Edupics.com has a wide assortment of fruits and veggies coloring pages.
  3. This blog posts pictures of school lunches from around the world.

I’ll be back in a couple of weeks. Enjoy the rest of summer.


2012
Aug 08

Peanut Butter Play Dough

by Hannah Holt »

2 comments


For those who always wanted to eat play dough

(and some who already do).

What you’ll need:

  • 2/3 cups creamy peanut butter
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp honey

1) Cream the peanut butter and half of the powdered sugar together. Gradually add the rest of the powdered sugar (the resulting mixture will be dry).

2) Beat in the honey. The dough should be firm but pliable, not too sticky.

3) Divide into six portions. Play with it or eat it or both.

4) Refrigerate or freeze any leftovers for another day.

My four and six year olds had a lot of fun playing with the dough. My eighteen month olds had a lot of fun eating it.

What else you can do with it?

Use it as the center for homemade chocolate peanut butter cups.

Warning… this is ridiculously yummy! Add a dash of vegetable oil to 1/2 cup of chocolate chips. Melt the chips in the microwave on high (stirring every 20 seconds until smooth). Using two teaspoons, put a little chocolate in the bottom of a few cupcake papers. Press the peanut butter dough into the chocolate and top with more chocolate. Let them set in the fridge for a couple hours.

Make double-trouble peanut butter cookies.

Place a ball of the peanut butter dough into the middle of your favorite peanut butter cookie recipe. Bake as usual. Enjoy the surprisingly soft and delicious center. The hubby and kids gave them a big thumbs up!

This recipe is like peanut butter Marzipan.

Enjoy!


2012
Aug 02

DIY: Glow-in-the-Dark* Paint

by Hannah Holt »

7 comments


This paint glows under black light.* With only two ingredients, it’s completely non-toxic (you could eat it), and it will brighten any black light party.

What you’ll need:

  • 1/2 cup tonic water
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch

1) Pour the tonic water into a small bowl and let it rest until it loses its fizzy.

2) Stir the two ingredients together.

3) Using paint brushes, decorate colored construction paper, skin, or other non-phosphorescent surfaces. (Most white papers won’t work because they also glow under black light. I used black construction paper.)

While working on my Spicy Alphabet book, I learned that tonic water glows under black light. I have a black light at home (who doesn’t?), so I tested it out.

It turns out tonic water ice cubes also glow under black light:

As does boiling tonic water:

Here’s the paint applied to my face:

When working on this post, I first tried adding tonic water to a variety of paints. None of them worked. The pigments in the dyes seemed to block tonic water’s glow. Finally my husband and I walked around our kitchen waving the black light over all the foods in our pantry. Cornstarch had the best luminescence, hence this recipe. We tried a few different ratios. The one-to-one ratio had a good consistency.

Most of my projects involve a lot of trial and error. Here’s a video I shared on my Facebook Page a while ago (from my Summer Science series):

What can I say? I like to play!

Happy painting!


2012
Jul 20

New to the Library: Spicy Alphabet

by Hannah Holt »

31 comments


It’s been a while since I’ve added anything to the reading library. Sorry about that. Life has been as crazy as two babies dancing on a window ledge.

However, I’m excited to show you my latest addition.

Click the bookshelf and read it now!

In the mean time, I’d love to hear about your favorite spices, and your thoughts on this book.


2012
Jun 21

Red, White, and Blue Meringues

by Hannah Holt »

2 comments


Meringue cookies are a delicious and low calorie addition to your festivities.

What you’ll need:

  • 6 egg whites (divided into three bowls, 2 egg whites/bowl)
  • 1 1/2 tsp cream of tartar (1/2 tsp per bowl)
  • 1 six ounce package black berry fusion Jell-O
  • 1 six ounce package berry blue Jell-O
  • 2/3 cups ultra fine sugar (regular granulated will work in a pinch)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Makes a boat-load of cookies (72 cookies!).

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.

Bowl #1 – Red

Let the egg whites sit until they are room temperature. Beat 2 egg whites until frothy and add 1/2 tsp cream of tarter. Continue beating until the mixture has soft peaks (fluffy and white but not tight). Add the black berry fusion Jell-O one tablespoon at a time until it is all combined. Beat the mixture until it forms stiff peaks (if you dip a spoon in and bring it out, the spike left behind will hold its shape). Spray a cookie sheet with non-stick spray and using two spoons, spoon cookies onto the tray. This bowl will make 24 cookies. (You will probably need two cookies sheets)

Place the cookie sheets in the preheated oven for 20 minutes. While the first batch is baking let’s move on to Bowl #2.

Bowl #2 – Blue

Beat 2 egg whites until frothy and add 1/2 tsp cream of tarter. Continue beating until the mixture has soft peaks. Add the berry blue Jell-O one tablespoon at a time until it is all combined. Beat the mixture until it forms stiff peaks. Spray a cookie sheet with non-stick spray and using two spoons, spoon cookies onto the tray. This bowl will make 24 cookies.

Once Bowl #1 cookies are finished baking, place these cookies in the preheated oven for 20 minutes. While this batch is baking let’s move on to Bowl #3.

Bowl #3 – White

Beat 2 egg whites until frothy and add 1/2 tsp cream of tarter. Continue beating until the mixture has soft peaks. Gradually add the white sugar into the mixture until it is all combined. Add the vanilla. Beat the mixture until it forms stiff peaks. Spray a cookie sheet with non-stick spray and using two spoons, spoon cookies onto the tray. This bowl will make 24 cookies. (Again, you will probably need two cookies sheets, but the cookies sheets from batch #1 are probably cool. So you can use these.)

Once Bowl #2 cookies are finished baking, place these cookies in the preheated oven for 20 minutes.

Tips:

  • This recipe makes a monster batch. I suspect you might be able to half the recipe and use 3 oz Jell-O packets. However, I haven’t tried it, so let me know if it works for you.
  • Also meringue cookies form best in a dry kitchen. If you have a lot of humidity, your meringues will sweat and melt.
  • Your beaters should be oil free. Avoid plastic bowls as these retain oil from previous uses. No egg yolks should be present in your meringues, or they won’t set.
  • Cooking meringues for 20 minutes at a time will yield delicious but marshmallow like (soft) cookies. If you like hard and crisp meringues, then place the cookies in the oven, turn off the heat, and let them sit undisturbed for 2 hours (or overnight). This will yield the drier cookie. However, this method just wasn’t practical with the number of batches I was making.
  • This method will work with other colors of Jell-O, too! (Like, red and green at Christmastime.)